Books I Enjoyed this Year

The Best Books I Read This Year

Some of these were read, others a combination of listening and reading. I’ve become a big fan of audiobooks (I am an auditory / visual learner.)

Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes, by E. Randolph Richards, Brandon J. O’Brian

Excellent book to remind us that not only must we read Scripture conscious of the culture into which it was first written (original audience). But we must understand are own cultural preunderstandings and the things we take for granted or assume to be universally true because we understand them to be–the things “that go without being said”.

While there was some application of the principles, particularly in a few passages, where I believe there are other explanations and applications than the ones provided, the questions they caused me to ask and concepts I had to review were helpful for my ongoing study of Scripture.

Pilgrim Theology:The Core Doctrines of Christian Discipleship, by Michael Horton

While I’m not Reformed (though I share many affinities with my Reformed brothers and sister), I thoroughly enjoyed this well written basic but not simplistic systematic theology by Michael Horton. He has a more comprehensive volume entitled, “The Christian Faith: A Systematic Theology for Pilgrims on the Way” (also now part of my digital library).

Prayer by Timothy Keller

Theologically and pastorally enjoyable.  Key reminder and challenge that the better we know God, the more purposeful and passionate our prayer life.

I also enjoyed chapter 7 on learning from three giants of the faith, Augustine, Luther and Calvin.

And the simply overview of 3 kinds of prayer:

  • Upward–God focused praise and thanksgiving
  • Inward–Encounter with God and confession
  • Outward–Supplication and intercession

You can read a short interview about Tim Keller’s book.

How Should We Then Live: The Rise and Decline of Western Thought and Culture by Francis Schaeffer

Great review of the development of cultural and the forming of the dominant philosophical world views. While the end of the book is fairly tied to the time period it was written in, most of the book is helpful in providing perspective on the world we live in today.

Honorable Mention

Preaching: Communicating Faith in an Age of Skepticism, by Timothy Keller

Particularly chapters 11 and 12 related to “reaching the people.”

Theology: The Basics by Alister E. McGrath

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